Shot to nothing

Shot to nothing

Hornvik Coastline

This picture has been sitting rejected and all alone in my archives for some years. The location is an obscure coastline in Hornvik, part of Hornstrandir. Some say this part touches the Arctic circle, but I am not sure. One thing I am sure of though is that despite the low visibility, the arctic circle must be in this photograph (or rather this photo could be from the Arctic circle)… even though it looks like “Nothing”.  The blue in the picture gives a sense of an abyss.  The mist had us stranded for a couple of days with no way of flying back and no point of doing much exploring.

 

Presentation

I gave it a letter-box crop. In the original, you can see the top of the outcropping rocks. I decided that cropping the tops off gives the image more mystery, it also allows attention to fall on the swirling water action around the mostly submerged rocks in the foreground.  This is an effect of the long exposure as the sea gently lapped against the shore.

How to Photograph the Northern Lights

How to Photograph the Northern Lights

A total guide to taking photographs of the Northern lights for Digital Cameras & wide angle lenses. This night photography guide includes camera settings, equipment suggestions and some Northern lights photo examples.

Selling Photos & making mistakes

Selling Photos & making mistakes

I have rented gallery space, used online portfolios, stock agencies and print on demand with varying degrees of success and failure.  By sharing my stories about the various methods I have tried can help you to make a better decision about selling your photo wall art on line.

5 Professional Poster Design Tips for Magnetic Brands

In a world that is becoming increasingly digitalized, businesses and marketers are choosing to invest more and more in methods which may not be traditional. However, the importance of billboards, flyers and posters still remains as a lot of people do prefer to look at...

Tony’s Magic Cloth Technique 1

Tony’s Magic Cloth Technique 1

The Magic Cloth Technique involves controlling the amount of exposure to different parts of a scene during a slow shutter. The technique involves dodging and burning over a long exposure.
Using a dark cloth (or card) you can reduce the exposure to the sky (or highlights) by covering the front of the lens for part of the exposure time

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